Calling all prattling gabblers, lubberly louts, flouting milksops, noddy meacocks, blockish grutnols, doddipol-joltheads, and jobbernol goosecaps

Looking for just the right invective to hurl at someone? Give old François Rabelais a go. Specifically, Sir Thomas Urquhart’s 1653 translation of Rabelais’ classic satirical adventure, Gargantua and Pantagruel (written 1532-1542). Here’s a sample:

The bun-sellers or cake-makers were in nothing inclinable to their request; but, which was worse, did injure them most outrageously, called them prattling gabblers, lickorous gluttons, freckled bittors, mangy rascals, shite-a-bed scoundrels, drunken roysters, sly knaves, drowsy loiterers, slapsauce fellows, slabberdegullion druggels, lubberly louts, cozening foxes, ruffian rogues, paltry customers, sycophant-varlets, drawlatch hoydens, flouting milksops, jeering companions, staring clowns, forlorn snakes, ninny lobcocks, scurvy sneaksbies, fondling fops, base loons, saucy coxcombs, idle lusks, scoffing braggarts, noddy meacocks, blockish grutnols, doddipol-joltheads, jobbernol goosecaps, foolish loggerheads, flutch calf-lollies, grouthead gnat-snappers, lob-dotterels, gaping changelings, codshead loobies, woodcock slangams, ninny-hammer flycatchers, noddypeak simpletons, turdy gut, shitten shepherds, and other suchlike defamatory epithets; saying further, that it was not for them to eat of these dainty cakes, but might very well content themselves with the coarse unranged bread, or to eat of the great brown household loaf.

A shout out to World Wide Words for scratching at this slubberdegullion of the English language.

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Kluster to capitalize on the wisdom of crowds

There’s an interesting article in today’s New York Times – Putting Innovation in the Hands of a Crowd – about a new startup called Kluster, “the newest in a lineup of companies using the Web to channel the collective wisdom of strangers into meaningful business strategies.” That has been the Wordlab philosophy for a decade now, minus that bit about having a meaningful business strategy.

The mention in the article of ideas “proudly found elsewhere” taps right into the ethos of Wordlab and our free community forum, the Wordboard:

Don Tapscott, the business strategy consultant and co-author of the book “Wikinomics,” said executives were quickly warming to the strategic value of “P.F.E.” ideas, or those “proudly found elsewhere.”

“Throughout the 20th century, we’ve had this view that talent is inside the company,” Mr. Tapscott said. “But with the Web, collaboration costs are dropping outside the boundaries of companies, so the world can become your talent.”

Mr. Tapscott, who credited Procter & Gamble with the P.F.E. concept, said executives can go overboard with the idea of outsourcing innovation if, in seeking such help, they expose too much of a company’s trade secrets. But so far, he knows of no business that has done so.

“They always err on the other side,” he said. “They don’t do enough.”

So, if you are in need of free, crowdsourced and possibly incentive-lubricated naming help for your company, product or goldfish, Wordlab is the place to be, with many registered members waiting to chime in with advice.

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